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Table of Contents: December 2011

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In a research article published in PLoS Medicine earlier this month, An Pan and colleagues examined data from two cohorts of the US Nurses’ Health Study and found that extended periods of rotating night shift work were associated with a modestly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, partly mediated through an association with increased body weight. The PLoS Medicine Editors discuss the link between shift work, diet, and type 2 diabetes in their December editorial, arguing that unhealthy eating should be considered a new form of occupational hazard. The Editors comment: “As the world of work becomes increasingly 24 hour, shift work will become more common. And if the data from this and other studies are to be taken at face value, shift work has the potential to accelerate the progression of the global epidemic of obesity and diabetes…Increasingly, public health advocates feel that concrete action is needed: governments need to legislate to improve the habits of consumers and take specific steps to ensure that it is easier and cheaper to eat healthily than not.”

Essays

The Primacy of Public Health Considerations in Defining Poor Quality Medicines

Paul N. Newton, Abdinasir A. Amin, Chris Bird, Phillip Passmore, Graham Dukes, Göran Tomson, Bright Simons, Roger Bate, Philippe J. Guerin, Nicholas J. White

Perspectives

Estimating the Burden of Malaria: The Need for Improved Surveillance

Ivo Mueller, Laurence Slutsker, Marcel Tanner

Policy Forums

Disclosure of Investigators' Recruitment Performance in Multicenter Clinical Trials: A Further Step for Research Transparency

Rafael Dal-Ré, David Moher, Christian Gluud, Shaun Treweek, Jacques Demotes-Mainard, Xavier Carné

Research Articles

Worldwide Incidence of Malaria in 2009: Estimates, Time Trends, and a Critique of Methods

Richard E. Cibulskis, Maru Aregawi, Ryan Williams, Mac Otten, Christopher Dye

Sex-Specific Immunization for Sexually Transmitted Infections Such as Human Papillomavirus: Insights from Mathematical Models

Johannes A. Bogaards, Mirjam Kretzschmar, Maria Xiridou, Chris J. L. M. Meijer, Johannes Berkhof, Jacco Wallinga

Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study

Ronan A. Lyons, Denise Kendrick, Elizabeth M. Towner, Nicola Christie, Steven Macey, Carol Coupland, Belinda J. Gabbe , on behalf of the UK Burden of Injuries Study Group

Surgery Versus Epilation for the Treatment of Minor Trichiasis in Ethiopia: A Randomised Controlled Noninferiority Trial

Saul N. Rajak, Esmael Habtamu, Helen A. Weiss, Amir Bedri Kello, Teshome Gebre, Asrat Genet, Robin L. Bailey, David C. W. Mabey, Peng T. Khaw, Clare E. Gilbert, Paul M. Emerson, Matthew J. Burton

Absorbable Versus Silk Sutures for Surgical Treatment of Trachomatous Trichiasis in Ethiopia: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Saul N. Rajak, Esmael Habtamu, Helen A. Weiss, Amir Bedri Kello, Teshome Gebre, Asrat Genet, Robin L. Bailey, David C. W. Mabey, Peng T. Khaw, Clare E. Gilbert, Paul M. Emerson, Matthew J. Burton