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Research Article

The Effect of Delaying Childbirth on Primary Cesarean Section Rates

  • Gordon C. S Smith mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: gcss2@cam.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Yolande Cordeaux,

    Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Ian R White,

    Affiliation: Medical Research Council (MRC) Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Dharmintra Pasupathy,

    Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Hannah Missfelder-Lobos,

    Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Jill P Pell,

    Affiliation: Department of Public Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom

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  • D. Stephen Charnock-Jones,

    Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Michael Fleming

    Affiliation: Information and Statistics Division, National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom

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  • Published: July 01, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050144

About the Authors

Gordon C. S Smith, Yolande Cordeaux, Dharmintra Pasupathy, Hannah Missfelder-Lobos, D. Stephen Charnock-Jones
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Ian R White
Medical Research Council (MRC) Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Jill P Pell
Department of Public Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Michael Fleming
Information and Statistics Division, National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Corresponding Author

Email: gcss2@cam.ac.uk

Competing Interests

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Author Contributions

GCSS had full access to all of the data in the study, takes responsibility for the integrity of the data, the accuracy of the data analysis, and is the guarantor. GCSS formed the hypothesis. MF performed the linkage and extracted the population data. GCSS and IRW performed the statistical analysis. GCSS and YC designed the contractility studies. YC, DP, and HML recruited patients, conducted the contractility studies, and extracted data. GCSS drafted the paper. GCSS, YC, IRW, DP, HML, JPP, DSCJ, and MF critically reviewed the draft for content and approved the final version of the paper.