Advertisement
Correspondence

Might Banning Trial Publication Do More Harm Than Good?

  • David Sackett mail

    sackett@bmts.com

    Affiliation: Harlot, Irish Lake, Ontario, Canada

    X
  • Published: July 26, 2005
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020220

About the Author

David Sackett
Harlot, Irish Lake, Ontario, Canada

Corresponding Author

Email: sackett@bmts.com

Competing Interests

DS has been wined, dined, supported, transported, and paid to speak by countless pharmaceutical firms for over 40 years, beginning with two research fellowships and interest-free loans that allowed him to finish medical school. Dozens of his randomized trials have been supported in part (but never in whole) by pharmaceutical firms, who never received or analysed primary data and never had veto power over any reports, presentations, or publications of the results. He has twice worked as a paid consultant to advise pharmaceutical firms on whether their products caused lethal side effects; on both occasions he told them yes. He has testified as an unpaid expert witness for a patient with stroke who successfully sued a manufacturer of oral contraceptives, and as a paid expert in preparing a class-action suit against a manufacturer of prosthetic heart valves.