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Research Article

Initial Severity and Antidepressant Benefits: A Meta-Analysis of Data Submitted to the Food and Drug Administration

  • Irving Kirsch mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: i.kirsch@hull.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom

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  • Brett J Deacon,

    Affiliation: University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, United States of America

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  • Tania B Huedo-Medina,

    Affiliation: Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America

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  • Alan Scoboria,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

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  • Thomas J Moore,

    Affiliation: Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, United States of America

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  • Blair T Johnson

    Affiliation: Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America

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  • Published: February 26, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050045

Reader Comments (48)

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Forest Plot

Posted by aruma99 on 14 May 2014 at 04:12 GMT

As a meta-analysis I was expecting to see a forest plot with confidence intervals and actual effect sizes, and the overall pooled effect. I would have thought that a basic requirement. Otherwise how are we able to actually compare the different RCTs. Unless we see this, it maybe that poorly designed trials (which could possibly explain why many are unpublished) are skewing the results. They may be perfectly well-designed but unless we actually see this, how are we supposed to know, especially with the study making such a significant conclusion.

No competing interests declared.