Advertisement
Research Article

Mortality in Iraq Associated with the 2003–2011 War and Occupation: Findings from a National Cluster Sample Survey by the University Collaborative Iraq Mortality Study

  • Amy Hagopian mail,

    hagopian@uw.edu

    Affiliation: Health Alliance International, Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Abraham D. Flaxman,

    Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Tim K. Takaro,

    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Sahar A. Esa Al Shatari,

    Affiliation: Human Resources Development and Training Center, Iraq Ministry of Health, Baghdad, Iraq

    X
  • Julie Rajaratnam,

    Affiliation: Harborview Medical Center, Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Stan Becker,

    Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Alison Levin-Rector,

    Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Lindsay Galway,

    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Berq J. Hadi Al-Yasseri,

    Affiliation: Iraq Ministry of Health, Baghdad, Iraq

    X
  • William M. Weiss,

    Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher J. Murray,

    Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Gilbert Burnham

    Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Published: October 15, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001533

Reader Comments (1)

Post a new comment on this article

How many excess deaths?

Posted by DonaldJohnson on 19 Oct 2013 at 17:17 GMT

I am a confused layperson. The abstract says there were over 400,000 excess deaths from 2003-2011, and in fact more than 500,000 when allowing for deaths in families that left Iraq. Over 60 percent were from violence. Yet within the paper it says that the number of deaths was 376,000, of which about 180,000 were excess deaths, and 130,000 from violence.

No competing interests declared.

RE: How many excess deaths?

larrymo replied to DonaldJohnson on 22 Oct 2013 at 22:52 GMT

376,000 is the number of deaths among adults aged 15–60 years, not total deaths

No competing interests declared.

RE: RE: How many excess deaths?

DonaldJohnson replied to larrymo on 23 Oct 2013 at 01:14 GMT

Yes, thanks. So 405,000 excess deaths, of which 187,000 were adults between 15-60 and of that group , 132,000 died from violence and over 60 percent of the total excess deaths came from violence. So there were over 240,000 from violence,nearly half either elderly or children, if one goes by their mid range estimate. Considerably higher than the IBC number, consistent with the 150,000 figure found in the IFHS study (for the period up to mid 2006) and much lower than the second Johns Hopkins paper (600,000 violent deaths by mid 2006).

No competing interests declared.