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The Role of Group Dynamics in Scientific Inconsistencies: A Case Study of a Research Consortium

  • Judith G. M. Rosmalen mail,

    j.g.m.rosmalen@umcg.nl

    Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Center for Psychiatric Epidemiology and Graduate School of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

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  • Albertine J. Oldehinkel

    Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Center for Psychiatric Epidemiology and Graduate School of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

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  • Published: December 13, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001143
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

Reader Comments (1)

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Epidemiology is a science more can share. Closer definition can be illuminating...

Posted by gary01 on 15 Dec 2011 at 06:36 GMT

The discussion offered in this paper is very much about aspects of research that have been floating with us for decades. An ability to do anything about it is hobbled by inherent resource that is limited, and perhaps not always influenced by the right forces. Funding does indeed affect research at both macro and micro levels.
The performance and contribution science and scientists are able to make to all species on the planet is something that rests with us all, and so appreciate the direction to this in the paper. Amazing achievements have been made in our understanding of how biological systems work. More to do yet... They have made impossible changes in failing wellbeing, possible. The social aspects of this, relating the significance of these discoveries and their application through market driven societies, has not always been equal. Indeed our capacity to reduce inherent cost of the applications of discovery can take it all further.
But taking a wider view, I would also like to offer that the ecological changes we as a species have introduced, have created disastrous consequences for others. I recall my parents commenting that discovering another planet to translate our life and ambitions to, was critical. They might have been right. In between, I would like to offer support for the time and cultural benefits of better identifying and integrating resource and expertise to discover and translate the issues that will improve life within our communities most.
Epidemiological studies have not received great support. The influences in our communities and between age groups are enormous. I put the suggestion that we might receive a clearer understanding of the effects of what we are living with, if more localised issues are defined and evaluated. Dare I suggest the politics and support for this is yet to see the light of day.
Thank you for the paper.

No competing interests declared.