Advertisement
Research Article

Factors Associated with Findings of Published Trials of Drug–Drug Comparisons: Why Some Statins Appear More Efficacious than Others

  • Lisa Bero mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: berol@pharmacy.ucsf.edu

    Affiliation: Clinical Pharmacy and Health Policy, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Fieke Oostvogel,

    Affiliation: Department of Mathematics, University of Leiden, The Netherlands

    X
  • Peter Bacchetti,

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Kirby Lee

    Affiliation: Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Published: June 05, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040184

Reader Comments (1)

Post a new comment on this article

Alternative interpretation

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:10 GMT

Author: Brad Snedecor
Position: Distinguished Engineer
Institution: N/A (private view)
E-mail: brs@gene.com
Submitted Date: June 06, 2007
Published Date: June 7, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

Your conclusions seem to overlook the possibility that drug manufacturers, using the information available to them, choose to fund studies where they have good reason to expect a favorable outcome in the study population. That is, when they expect their drug is superior, they are eager to fund a study to show that.

Competing interests declared: My company doesn't develop statins.