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Research Article

The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mortality Disparities in the United States

  • Majid Ezzati mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: majid_ezzati@harvard.edu

    Affiliations: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Initiative for Global Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Ari B Friedman,

    Affiliation: Initiative for Global Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Sandeep C Kulkarni,

    Affiliations: Initiative for Global Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher J. L Murray

    Affiliations: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Initiative for Global Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Published: April 22, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050066

Reader Comments (9)

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A coordinated attack on the Obesity Epidemic

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:25 GMT

Author: Andrea DeSantis
Position: DO
Institution: Carolinas Medical Center North Park Clinic
E-mail: jbarkley2@carolina.rr.com
Submitted Date: April 24, 2008
Published Date: April 25, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

I have practiced family medicine in a low income clinic for the past 10 years. I have I seen many woman and men die prematurely of cardiovascular disease related to obesity. My impression is that the combination of tobacco, poor diet and the genetic predisposition to obesity and diabetes are at play. Loosing weight by changing a lifetime of unhealthy eating and exercise habits seems to be as difficult as quitting smoking. Health behaviors become entrenched at a very early age. The solution must be done through the individual but also through reform of our public policy. Our Food Stamp program needs to look more like the WIC program. Our schools have to start serving more appealing fruits and vegetable type lunches that are free of trans-fats and lower in sugar. Our towns and cities need to be planned to encourage public, pedestrian, and bicycle transportation. Smoking cessation drugs and programs need to be more affordable. The food industry needs to do their part as well.

No competing interests declared.