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Research Article

Earlier Mother's Age at Menarche Predicts Rapid Infancy Growth and Childhood Obesity

  • Ken K Ong mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: ken.ong@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk

    Affiliations: Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Kate Northstone,

    Affiliation: Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom

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  • Jonathan CK Wells,

    Affiliation: Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom

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  • Carol Rubin,

    Affiliation: National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, United States of America

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  • Andy R Ness,

    Affiliation: Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom

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  • Jean Golding,

    Affiliation: Department of Community Based Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom

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  • David B Dunger

    Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Published: April 24, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040132

Reader Comments (2)

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How about breastfeeding?

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:08 GMT

Author: Ann Perrine
Position: Paediatric surgeon
Institution: No affiliation was given
E-mail: annbsj@hotmail.com
Submitted Date: April 25, 2007
Published Date: April 27, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

It was interesting to read your study. As a paediatric surgeon I am not surprised about your findings. Mothers whom exclusively breastfed their babies [meaning no supplements given to the infant] do not have their menstruation back for at least the duration of the exclusive breastfeeding. So the important factor here is actually the breastfeeding, as you cannot force-nurse a breastfed baby so babies develop the ability to regulate their hunger and food intake ratio [meaning having a full nursing session one feeding and snacking the following just like older people does]. This is directly links for the control in the brain, resulting healthier eating habits, and leaner children less incidence of obesity. I would love to see you look in to this connection and publish another paper.

No competing interests declared.