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Research Article

Social Relationships and Mortality Risk: A Meta-analytic Review

  • Julianne Holt-Lunstad equal contributor mail,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Timothy B. Smith

    julianne_holt-lunstad@byu.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America

    X
  • Timothy B. Smith equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Timothy B. Smith

    Affiliation: Department of Counseling Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America

    X
  • J. Bradley Layton

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Published: July 27, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000316

Reader Comments (2)

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Cause and effect

Posted by ikay on 28 Jul 2010 at 20:33 GMT

Is it possible that it's the other way around - being healthy means you have more friends?

I've no medical training, but imagine there must be many medical conditions that both shorten life-span and also make it difficult to get out and make friends.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Cause and effect

dougiedd replied to ikay on 27 Aug 2010 at 07:32 GMT

Yes, it is possible and the study authors addressed this concern in their discussion.

No competing interests declared.