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Research Article

The Impact of eHealth on the Quality and Safety of Health Care: A Systematic Overview

  • Ashly D. Black,

    Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Josip Car,

    Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Claudia Pagliari,

    Affiliation: eHealth Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Chantelle Anandan,

    Affiliation: eHealth Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Kathrin Cresswell,

    Affiliation: eHealth Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Tomislav Bokun,

    Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Brian McKinstry,

    Affiliation: eHealth Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Rob Procter,

    Affiliation: National Centre for e-Social Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

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  • Azeem Majeed,

    Affiliation: Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Aziz Sheikh mail

    aziz.sheikh@ed.ac.uk

    Affiliation: eHealth Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Published: January 18, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000387

Reader Comments (2)

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Impact of eHealth

Posted by AnnieKelleher on 24 Jan 2011 at 12:54 GMT

Nearly all other industries have automated and this has accelerated the pace of myriad interactions and information transfer. Other industries also questioned if, in the end, cost effectiveness was a quantifiable outcome. My sense is that it is not truly quantifiable, but by the time this question can be asked, it's too late. The health care industry has become too complex NOT to automate; and it will cost -- in dollars, in IT support/storage/maint, as well as the implicit cost of fewer and fewer direct interactions between providers and patients. This final issue also exists in all other automated industries. Secure information? Nothing is secure.

No competing interests declared.