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Research Article

Aripiprazole in the Maintenance Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: A Critical Review of the Evidence and Its Dissemination into the Scientific Literature

  • Alexander C. Tsai equal contributor mail,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Alexander C. Tsai, Nicholas Z. Rosenlicht

    nicholas.rosenlicht@ucsf.edu

    Affiliation: Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America

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  • Nicholas Z. Rosenlicht equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Alexander C. Tsai, Nicholas Z. Rosenlicht

    Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Francisco and San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Jon N. Jureidini,

    Affiliation: Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

    X
  • Peter I. Parry,

    Affiliation: Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Division of Mental Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

    X
  • Glen I. Spielmans,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, Minnesota, United States of America

    X
  • David Healy

    Affiliation: Department of Psychological Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom

    X
  • Published: May 03, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000434

Reader Comments (2)

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Aripiprazole and evidence of efficacy

Posted by PhillipaHay on 16 May 2011 at 23:53 GMT

This is an important study and highlights the gap often found between evidence and practice. However, it must be emphasised to patients treated with aripiprazole that you should not cease your medication but you are encouraged to discuss this paper with your doctor.
The study does not mean aripiprazole will not work for you, but it does not have the same good evidence behind it as other treatment options have. Some treatments e.g. penicillan, really were major breakthroughs but most new medications are not like penicillan.
The take home message I think is that new drugs should be properly evaluated and compared directly with long-standing well researched alternatives before being recommended for widespread use.

No competing interests declared.