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Research Article

Effectiveness and Cost Effectiveness of Expanding Harm Reduction and Antiretroviral Therapy in a Mixed HIV Epidemic: A Modeling Analysis for Ukraine

  • Sabina S. Alistar mail,

    sabina-alistar@stanfordalumni.org

    Affiliation: Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Douglas K. Owens,

    Affiliations: Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, United States of America, Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Margaret L. Brandeau

    Affiliation: Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Published: March 01, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000423

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Russian translation of this article

Posted by plosmedicine on 15 Jul 2011 at 10:15 GMT

(0.21 MB DOC
http://plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000423#article1.body1.sec5.supplementary-material8.caption1.p2

Health Connections International, a non-profit organisation created with the specific aim of improving the responses to the HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and drug use epidemics in the former Soviet Union and other regions, has translated this article from English into Russian. To download the PDF Russian translation, click on the link below:

Russian translation: http://www.plosmedicine.org/attachments/pmed.1000423_Russian.pdf

A summary of the aims of Health Connections International and the importance of making this particular article available in Russian, follows:

A central tenet of Health Connections International (HCI) focuses on ensuring access to evidence-based medicine and policies surrounding the HIV, tuberculosis and drug use epidemics which still plague vast resource-limited settings. In particular, HCI has focused on developing web-based tools for the Russian-language region and providing translations into Russian on the most recent developments towards the prevention, treatment, care and support of HIV, TB and drug use.

We are thus delighted to work with <em>PLoS Medicine</em> to make a Russian translation available a key piece of evidence on the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of providing antiretroviral therapy and opiate substitution therapy to drug users in Ukraine, published by <em>PLoS Medicine</em> in March of this year and co-authored by Sabina S. Alistar, Douglas K. Owens, and Margaret L. Brandeau.

Many of the countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia continue to experience a growth in HIV cases whilst many other regions are witnessing a decline or steadying in HIV incidence. At the same time, despite the need to provide the full range of services for those who are most affected by HIV—in the region, this is largely concentrated amongst injecting drug users—policies and practices as well as human and financial resource constraints limit the availability and acceptability of providing opiate substitution therapy to those who inject drugs. In addition, due to a variety of reasons, accessing antiretroviral treatment is often more difficult for drug users.

Because this article in particular is based on research carried out in Ukraine, it is particularly important to those working throughout the countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Through translating it into Russian, we will help ensure that those in Ukraine as well as throughout the Russian-language region have access to evidence which supports the provision of access to treatment for both drug use and HIV for those most in need. Furthermore, by providing the Russian translation, we believe this furthers advances the core principles of PLoS.

To learn more about HCI, please visit www.healthconnections.info.

No competing interests declared.