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Why Do Evaluations of eHealth Programs Fail? An Alternative Set of Guiding Principles

  • Trisha Greenhalgh mail,

    p.greenhalgh@qmul.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Healthcare Innovation and Policy Unit, Centre for Health Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom

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  • Jill Russell

    Affiliation: Division of Medical Education, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Published: November 02, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000360

Reader Comments (5)

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Not an example of changing goals?

Posted by jwfone on 05 Nov 2010 at 14:18 GMT

Second, outcomes are not stable; they erode and change over time and across contexts. In the SCR program, it was originally planned that patients would access their electronic record from home via linked software called HealthSpace, thereby becoming “empowered”. But HealthSpace was subsequently uncoupled from the SCR program because it was deemed “high risk” by civil servants [24].
http://plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000360#article1.body1.sec2.p5

Assuming this means 'goals can change over time', this in itself would be a judgement on a project. In the SCR example given, surely this does mean that the goal was not fulfilled by the SCR + Healthspace - the reason being the de-scoping? I.e. this does not seem to be an example of a problem with the philosophical approach, but just an example of how a goal was not fulfilled.

Presumably if the original goal was to empower patients by providing access to summary care data then this might have been achieved by non-Healthspace means, such as opening up access to 3rd party viewing software? Or even influencing the development of direct patient access to GP system data (available for some GP systems)?

No competing interests declared.