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Giving Legs to Restless Legs: A Case Study of How the Media Helps Make People Sick

  • Steven Woloshin equal contributor mail,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Steven Woloshin, Lisa M Schwartz

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: steven.woloshin@dartmouth.edu.

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  • Lisa M Schwartz equal contributor

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Steven Woloshin, Lisa M Schwartz

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  • Published: April 11, 2006
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030170
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

Reader Comments (3)

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Doctors should be smarter than this

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:06 GMT

Author: Andrew Breza
Position: Undergraduate Student
Institution: The George Washington University
E-mail: breza@gwu.edu
Submitted Date: March 04, 2007
Published Date: March 5, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

There is a reason that we have such safeguards on prescription drugs. Physicians ought to know enough not to prescribe a drug that has not been established through medical literature as being medically necessary for a given condition. This is the same argument that I use to support the work of pharmaceutical sales reps.

Here is a question for the physicians who read this: would you prescribe a drug where you do not think it is needed?

Competing interests declared: Former intern in a pharmaceutical company. I have never worked on any direct-to-consumer advertising but I have worked back office support for sales reps.