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Research Article

Association of Prenatal and Childhood Blood Lead Concentrations with Criminal Arrests in Early Adulthood

  • John Paul Wright,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Kim N Dietrich mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: kim.dietrich@uc.edu

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • M. Douglas Ris,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Richard W Hornung,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Stephanie D Wessel,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Bruce P Lanphear,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Mona Ho,

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Mary N Rae

    Affiliation: Cincinnati Children's Environmental Health Center, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • Published: May 27, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050101

Reader Comments (3)

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Lead sources from drinking water

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:26 GMT

Author: Anita Knight
Position: Ms./retired
Institution: Retired
E-mail: atigerclaw@gmail.com
Submitted Date: May 28, 2008
Published Date: May 29, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

It is disturbing that no mention of lead from fluoridation agents that are commercial grade. See AWWA Standard for Fluorosilicic Acid B703-06, latest issue, Foreword gives source and process evolving the liquid form most often used in fluoridation. Page 13 is an entire page of contaminants, heavy metals as arsenic, lead and more to radionuclides as uranium and radium 226-228, which degrade to 3 isotopes of lead.

The PubMed site reports Neurotoxicology, Sept. 2007, "Effects of fluoridation and disinfection agent combinations on lead leaching from leaded-brass parts", noting the chloramine and FSA resulted in lead spiking over 900ppb.
So this is actually 2 sources of lead added to our drinking water....

Then, consider processed foods and beverages made with this combination, and that it doesn't evaporate, but concentrates. Also, cooking with this water is even more adding to the burden in our diets.

No competing interests declared.