Advertisement
Research Article

Effect of the California Tobacco Control Program on Personal Health Care Expenditures

  • James M Lightwood,

    Affiliations: Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, School of Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Alexis Dinno,

    Affiliation: Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Stanton A Glantz mail

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: glantz@medicine.ucsf.edu

    Affiliations: Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 26, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050178

Reader Comments (9)

Post a new comment on this article

The Nature of the Program Matters

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:31 GMT

Author: Stanton Glantz
Position: Professor of Medicine
Institution: UC San Francisco
E-mail: glantz@medicine.ucsf.edu
Submitted Date: October 26, 2008
Published Date: October 29, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

The reason that we described the nature and key messages of the California Tobacco Control Program is that they do, in fact, matter. Increasing distrust of the tobacco industry is a strong predictor of smoking behavior as is creation of smokefree environments (see citations in our original paper).

Weaker programs, or programs focused on children, would not be expected to show the same magnitude benefits that the California Program demonstrated.

The fact that secondhand smoke causes lung cancer has been established since 1986, when the US Surgeon General published "The Health Consequences of Involuntary Smoking." Many additional disease have been added to the list of those caused by secondhand smoke since then, most importantly, heart disease.

No competing interests declared.