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Research Article

A Prospective Study of Red and Processed Meat Intake in Relation to Cancer Risk

  • Amanda J Cross mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: crossa@mail.nih.gov

    Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Michael F Leitzmann,

    Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Mitchell H Gail,

    Affiliation: Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Albert R Hollenbeck,

    Affiliation: AARP, Washington DC, United States of America

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  • Arthur Schatzkin,

    Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Rashmi Sinha

    Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Published: December 11, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040325

Reader Comments (10)

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Re: A Prospective Study of Red and Processed Meat Intake in Relation to Cancer Risk

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:17 GMT

Author: Geoffrey Kabat
Position: Senior Epidemiologist
Institution: Albert Einstein College of Medicine
E-mail: gkabat@aecom.yu.edu
Submitted Date: December 11, 2007
Published Date: December 12, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

Cross et al. present interesting evidence of a dose-response relationship between intake of both red meat and processed meat with risk of lung cancer. They estimate that 10% of lung cancer cases might be prevented if all individuals reduced their red meat intake to that of the lowest quartile. Given the extremely large number of lung cancer cases in their study (6,769), it would be of great interest to know whether the association with meat intake differed by histologic type of lung cancer (squamous cell, oat cell, adenocarcinoma, other). Furthermore, although the authors state that there were no differences in their results by sex for sites other than pancreatic cancer, it would informative to look at the sex-specific results by histologic type.

No competing interests declared.