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Why Current Publication Practices May Distort Science

  • Neal S Young mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail:

  • John P. A Ioannidis,
  • Omar Al-Ubaydli
  • Published: October 07, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050201

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Fighting Inflation in Scientific Findings

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:30 GMT

Author: Daniel Luchins
Position: Chief Mental Health Research
Institution: Jesse Brown VAMC
Submitted Date: October 07, 2008
Published Date: October 9, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

Young et al are to be commended for their intriguing article on how current publishing practices might distort science. In keeping with their analogy to economics I would like to suggest two additional 'inflation fighting' measure that were published in an opinion piece entitled "Where have All the Breakthroughs Gone."(Psychiatric Services 59:597 June 2008).One would be a disclosure by authors ( similar to a financial disclosure) of previous work that has failed to be replicated. Second would be an ‘obituary section’ in medical journals providing a follow –up on previously published articles whose conclusions have since been shown to be wrong.

Competing interests declared: I quote myself

RE: Fighting Inflation in Scientific Findings

ccrutchley replied to plosmedicine on 08 Aug 2013 at 21:18 GMT

This suggestion is too superb to ever gain acceptance. Admittedly, it would be hard to monitor compliance.

No competing interests declared.