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Essay

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Why Most Published Research Findings Are False

  • John P. A. Ioannidis
  • Published: August 30, 2005
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124

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Let Truth Bare Sway

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:14 GMT

Author: mark bellisario
Position: student
Institution: UCSF
E-mail: mrbellisario@yahoo.com
Submitted Date: October 04, 2007
Published Date: October 8, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

I agree that most research shows up as false positives. I feel that the race for some research groups to publish findings on hot, new science topics as quickly as possible, or being payed by some companies to produce the results needed, has lead to a boom of lacking research. I mean researchers that don't spend enough time preparing, and executing so that confounding variables can be ruled out, the number of subjects can be increased, more trials and studies with similar outcomes, etc.

The literature is full of these types of studies that rely on p-value much more than repetition.

No competing interests declared.