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Research Article

Combined Impact of Health Behaviours and Mortality in Men and Women: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study

  • Kay-Tee Khaw mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: kk101@medschl.cam.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Nicholas Wareham,

    Affiliation: Medical Research Council, Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Sheila Bingham,

    Affiliation: Medical Research Council, Dunn Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Ailsa Welch,

    Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Robert Luben,

    Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Nicholas Day

    Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Published: January 08, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050012

Reader Comments (6)

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reported plasma vitamin C levels are too high

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:19 GMT

Author: Furio Brighenti
Position: Professor Human Nutrition
Institution: Department of Public Health
E-mail: furio.brighenti@unipr.it
Submitted Date: January 31, 2008
Published Date: February 4, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

Sir,
the cutoff vitamin C level reported in the paper (>50 mmol/l) is possibly affected by misspelling, and should be read as micromols/l . Beside biological plausibility, the same authors in the same EPIC-Norfolk population correctly reported plasma vitamin C levels in the range 28-78 micromol/l for opposite quartiles of plasma vitamin C levels (1).
A prompt correction would be greatly appreciated.

1) Myint PK, Luben RN, Welch AA, Bingham SA, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT. Plasma vitamin C concentrations predict risk of incident stroke over 10 y in 20 649 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer Norfolk prospective population study. 2008 Jan;87(1):64-9

No competing interests declared.