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Research Article

Donor-Derived Brain Tumor Following Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in an Ataxia Telangiectasia Patient

  • Ninette Amariglio,

    Affiliations: Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel, Institute of Hematology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

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  • Abraham Hirshberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Oral Pathology, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Bernd W Scheithauer,

    Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • Yoram Cohen,

    Affiliation: Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Ron Loewenthal,

    Affiliation: Tissue Typing Laboratory, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Luba Trakhtenbrot,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hematology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

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  • Nurit Paz,

    Affiliation: Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Maya Koren-Michowitz,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hematology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

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  • Dalia Waldman,

    Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Leonor Leider-Trejo,

    Affiliation: Institute of Pathology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Amos Toren,

    Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Shlomi Constantini,

    Affiliation: Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Gideon Rechavi mail

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: gidi.rechavi@sheba.health.gov.il

    Affiliations: Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel, Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

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  • Published: February 17, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000029

Reader Comments (11)

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Why stem cells turn cancerous

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:34 GMT

Author: Angel Jimenez
Position: unemployed
Institution: home
E-mail: angelojimenez@optonline.net
Submitted Date: February 21, 2009
Published Date: February 24, 2009
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

These results point clearly to cells that are seeking their true place in a new multicellular environment. Unable to make contact with their own kind, they begin to express earlier Cell Recognition Factors. Tied in with the expression of these early-development factors comes the cancerous state which reflects the behavior of multicellular cells early in their development. Please see http://ortholex.blogspot.... for more details.

If you take any stem cell and put it in a place it doesn't recognize, it will become cancerous. This is particularly so with allografts. Of course, the immune system or a self-destruct mechanism may intervene.

Angel Jimenez, B.A. (Biology '73)

No competing interests declared.